Socceroo Realm – Top 5 Moments of 2017

7 January 2018

1) The end of an era for the Socceroo Realm

It’s been a year of transition for the Socceroo Realm. The personal webspace that’s been home for it for almost 20 years is now a thing of the past. While the site is still alive on the alphalink domain (select “Archive” from the main menu here to reach it), moving house in November and changing internet providers means I’ve lost access to it. Eventually, presuming the host ISP gets its act together, it will disappear totally. So it’s only this site, hosted by WordPress, that is being updated.

The old Socceroo Realm website

The old Socceroo Realm website as it stands now

2) Australia through to play Honduras as Ange Postecoglou shoots through

The other big event of 2017 was World Cup qualification for Russia 2018. Australia struggled through the group phase, and while they did well to score 19 points and only lose 1 game for the entire phase, it wasn’t enough to secure a top two spot and therefore direct qualification. So it was off to the playoffs where they overcame a stubborn Syria and a meek Honduras. Although, to coach Ange Postecoglou’s credit, the team played some of their best football for the entire campaign. Speaking of Ange…

3) Australia to play France, Peru & Denmark at Russia 2018; Ange Postecoglou quits

Ange Postecoglou shoots through. Yes, qualifies for the World Cup. Yes, quits the team. It’s possibly never happened anywhere else in the world before. A combination of preciousness to occasional media criticism, a long held grudge against Football Federation Australia and another job lined up, seemed behind the decision. Indeed, Postecoglou has signed with Yokohama F Marinos in the J-League, which was the rumoured outcome all along.

4) The Iran Game 20 Years On – Recounting the Memories

On more a personal note, and the reason for the Socceroo Realm in the first place, the infamous Iran Game of 1997 had its 20th anniversary. Strangely not too much fanfare about it compared to the last milestone of the 15th anniversary. No doubt because all the players of the time have retired, and there’s only so much it can gnaw at our soul anymore – especially since Australia had just qualified for its fourth World Cup in succession. Maybe I need to watch the match again to rekindled the distress and torture of that infamous night? The post linked above is actually a slightly modified version of the one written 5 years ago. With the old website no longer active, more of these “Blasts from the Past” will be feature in future.

5) Pros and Cons of a 48-team World Cup

In the world if FIFA, rarely something happens without controversy, and this time it’s the decision to expand the World Cup to 48 teams for 2026. You know what? Despite being a bit indifferent about it in the post above, now I believe it’s the right thing to do. It will happen sooner or later so may as well be sooner.

Honourable Mentions…

Australia featured in the Confederations Cup this year and performed well enough, and in what was once a staple in the Socceroo Realm, a “What Went Wrong” post returned, albeit for not qualifying for Russia 2018 directly. While I’ve written nothing all year about the women’s team, the Matildas, they are on fire. Winning the four-team Tournament of Nations in the USA in July and August by beating the hosts 1-0, Japan 4-2 and Brazil 6-1, and then beating Brazil in Australia in two internationals in September. On the back of this success, Australia plans to bid for the Women’s World Cup of 2023. Let’s hope it’s not a repeat of the last time Australia made such a bid – for the 2007 edition. With Australia the only bidder, FIFA extended the deadline and asked China to bid, and duly awarded it to them.

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Confederations Cup 2017 Provides Encouragement for Vital Japan Clash

05 July 2017

Australia completed their Confederations Cup campaign in Russia with a loss, two draws, and plenty of encouragement for the crucial World Cup qualifier away to Japan on 31 August. The campaign kicked off with a 3-2 loss to Germany. It was a shocking first half, constantly exposed at the back, unable to keep the ball, clueless going forward, and lucky to be only 2-1 down at half time. Germany extended the lead to 3-1 on 48 minutes and then notably relaxed. While it’s true Australia began to assert more control and played much better, especially once they scored their second goal to bring it to 3-2 on 56 minutes, the Germans remained in general control. They dominated possession with 59%, doubled the shots on goal 18 to 9, and won more corners 4 to 1.

The second match, against Cameroon, was a more even contest, with Australia accruing more possession with 54% and Cameroon more shots and corners, 19 to 5 and 8 to 2, respectively. While both sides fluffed key chances, Cameroon had the better ones and Australia could lament the poor goal-keeping for Cameroon’s goal. Both teams would have left the field believing they should have won. The third game, against Chile, was easily Australia’s best performance for ages, not just this tournament. Needing to win by 2 goals to advance to the semi finals, they deservedly led at half time only to miss a series of decent chances early in the second half, eventually for Chile to equalise. Coach Ange Postecoglou has been experimenting with 3 at the back for the past two World Cup qualifiers, for the 4-0 loss in an exhibition match against Brazil in Melbourne, and into this competition – to obvious mixed success. It was crucial that some progress be shown to boost confidence for the final two World Cup qualifiers of this final group phase.

After the match in Japan, Australia’s final World Cup qualifier is against Thailand in Melbourne. While a win is obviously a must, ideally a draw in Japan is also required. Current situation sees Australia in third spot on goal difference (by one goal) on 16 points behind Saudi Arabia, and a point behind Japan on 17 points. Saudi Arabia will hope to win in Oman in their next match to take them to 19 points, which would leave Australia in a perilous state if they lost to Japan. Japan would be through on 20 points, with Saudi Arabia on 19 and Australia on 16 to fight for the final automatic spot.

With Saudi Arabia vs Japan the final match for those teams, a draw there would see Australia rely on the playoffs regardless of the result against Thailand, and would ruin the current promotion about the match in Melbourne as being the first decisive home qualifier since Uruguay in 2005. That’s why a draw against Japan is so crucial. The group would be wide open with Saudi Arabia on 19, Japan on 18 and Australia on 17, meaning any win would be enough against Thailand as long as Saudi Arabia don’t beat Japan. Otherwise goal difference would matter, with Australia needing at least a two goal win over Thailand.

Confederations Cup – Group B

Fisht Stadium – Sochi 19 June 2017 – 18:00 Local time
Australia 2 (Rogic 41′, Juric 56′) – Germany 3 (Stindl 5′, Draxler 44′ pk, Goretzka 48′)

Saint Petersburg Stadium – Saint Petersburg 22 June 2017 – 18:00 Local time
Cameroon 1 (Anguissa 45’+1) – Australia 1 (Milligan 60′ pk)

Spartak Stadium – Moscow 25 June 2017 – 18:00 Local time
Chile 1 (Rodriguez 67′) – Australia 1 (Troisi 42′)

 

Socceroo Realm – Top 5 Moments of 2016

15 January 2017

A very quiet year for the Socceroos, football in general, and the Socceroo Realm. It’s ironic that with the move into Asia and therefore more serious matches that the net result is a dilution of the product. Win here, draw there, add the occasional loss, ignore the friendlies, it’s the pattern now. Even in the midst of a World Cup qualifying campaign it doesn’t lend itself to great highlights. Then there’s the impact of Twitter being such a convenient tool for instant and concise opinion. I can bang off something there immediately on the phone instead of sit in front of a computer for something more structured.

In the sprit of trying to return some zing to upcoming World Cup qualifiers and the year in general, here’s the Top 5 highlights for 2016.

1) Australia finish the year with three draws in World Cup qualifying

After starting with wins over Iraq and the UAE, the final group phase of qualifying was beginning to look like a procession. Even commentators were talking about wrapping it up with 2 or 3 games to go. Not so fast! Draws to Japan, Saudi Arabia and Thailand provided us with a nice reality check and brought us back to the pack. Ostensibly the group is in a four-way tie for the top 2 places at the half-way point so it’s effectively a reset. With 3 of those 5 remaining games also at home, Australia is still well placed to finish in the top 2.

2) Thailand 2 – Australia 2

This was a stunningly exciting World Cup qualifier to end the year, with Thailand running Australia ragged and playing inspired football in tribute to the recent death of their king. In fact, they should have won. With Iraq, they are the two teams seemingly out of contention at the moment. The group: Saudia Arabia 10, Japan 10, Australia 9, UAE 9, Iraq 3, Thailand 1.

3) Confederations Cup 2017 Draw

Australia will play Chile, Germany and an unknown African team. Please don’t let it be Ghana, as that would be 3 repeat opponents from previous World Cups (Chile 2014, Germany and Ghana 2010). In the other group is Russia, Mexico, Portugal and New Zealand. That’s a much more sexier group, particularly playing the hosts Russia. Mexico is an opponent we’ve dealt with easily in the past and haven’t played for a while, and when is the last time we played Portugal?

4) England 2 – Australia 1

Yes, we played England mid-year. This was a match more notable for they fact I couldn’t recognise England’s team as much as anyone in England could recognise Australia’s team. Given that we’re so entrenched in Asia these days and have so many meaningful matches, these so-called “friendly” matches are becoming more and more exhibition in status as the years pass. Even such a traditional rivalry like England vs Australia doesn’t help them.

5) Australia 1 – Japan 1

The first half of this September World Cup qualifier was possibly the worst display of any Australian team ever. Limp, clueless and ineffective were the words of choice at the time. The only real exception is the Youth World Cup of 2009 in Egypt where Australia was hammered in all three games and Craig Foster still saw it fit to write the team a letter of congratulations for the “brand” of football they played. This entry is only here to serve as encouragement for all future Australian teams that think they might of played the worst ever. No, you probably did alright compared to this woeful performance.